Skip to main content

Formula-driven surface in Revit

The heading to this blog reads "...trails of projects too small to be considered or too large to be accomplished... "
This time it's one of the short easy-come easy-go projects, start to end in 2 hours.


By chance I came across a challenge on an AUGI forum:
http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=119544


The subject "Revit can't do it" and some names I recognized got my attention, and before I realized I was fighting to get a solution. The puzzle consisted in drawing the shape of the British Museum atrium roof.
Fortunately part of the briefing information was a link to a geometric analysis of the shape:
http://opus.bath.ac.uk/14111/1/ChrisDeakin2001.pdf


Based on the capability of the new adaptive components I quickly built a family that would drive the height from the coordinates x y (Reporting Parameters) of the Adaptive Point (using in principle the technique described by Zach Kron here), but using the complicated formulas in the report...


The result is a Revit family with a lot of maths... and the surface of the British Museum:






You can find more details in the AUGI forum:
http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=119544&page=4


Cheers,
William.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My reading list
Mathematic explorations

Back on the saddle after a long silence, this time bringing a list of books that have kept me busy... is this a good excuse for not writing blog entries???

With a deadline for this afternoon I cannot spend a lot of time describing each book... yet I want to push myself to communicate some of the mind-opening good reads I came across recently. Most are not new books, and probably you will recognise them.

Without further introduction, here's a list of books about maths, with a twist:

Godel, Escher, Bach: and eternal golden braid by D. Hofstadter

The_Emperor's New Mind by Roger Penrose

In Pursuit of the Unknown: 17 Equations That Changed the World by Ian Stewart

Introducing Chaos, a graphic guide

Art and Physics by Leonard Shlain

Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension by Matt Parker

So, these are some of my current and past reads. Have you read them? Any recommendations down these lines?


In future entries I will explore books about design and programming, creative code, artific…

First steps in RevitPythonShell

A couple of months ago, and a couple of weeks ago I have presented  a quick primer of Python scripting on the Revit Platform at the Manchester and London Revit User Groups. Both have been fantastic experiences, summarized the evening I was having a beer (or #BIMbeer) and heard someone say "I've been told that the other day there was an interesting presentation on Python at the Manchester Revit User Group", to what I replied "That was me, thanks!".

My main objective is to trigger curiosity and push at least some people to discover that the programming edge is not that hard to climb, and things appear much nicer from those heights. I have to clarify that among non-programmers I can pretend to be one, but in all ernesty I am a wannabe noob of a programmer, despite a few lines of code I cannot understand does not stop me from trying to understand it!!

Following a recent request on Twitter to share the presentation and thinking that they are probably available somew…