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Formula-driven surface in Revit

The heading to this blog reads "...trails of projects too small to be considered or too large to be accomplished... "
This time it's one of the short easy-come easy-go projects, start to end in 2 hours.


By chance I came across a challenge on an AUGI forum:
http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=119544


The subject "Revit can't do it" and some names I recognized got my attention, and before I realized I was fighting to get a solution. The puzzle consisted in drawing the shape of the British Museum atrium roof.
Fortunately part of the briefing information was a link to a geometric analysis of the shape:
http://opus.bath.ac.uk/14111/1/ChrisDeakin2001.pdf


Based on the capability of the new adaptive components I quickly built a family that would drive the height from the coordinates x y (Reporting Parameters) of the Adaptive Point (using in principle the technique described by Zach Kron here), but using the complicated formulas in the report...


The result is a Revit family with a lot of maths... and the surface of the British Museum:






You can find more details in the AUGI forum:
http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=119544&page=4


Cheers,
William.

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