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One thing at a time

I've been trying to write a long post with a recap of several interesting things I am working on at the moment... but I've been so busy at them that I am struggling to find time to put the pen to the paper...
So here I am, killing time while my wife does some shopping, and deciding that a series of short posts are better than the one and only recap.
This time I will refer to the mobile technology. Did I mention that I am sitting in a shop? This is in fact my first post using Blogger, a free app for my android. Sweet!
Now that around 80 people in the office are using the same phone model I have, we have been exchanging tips and recommendations... and occasional frustration when it 'goes pear shape' (very English expression I learnt only recently).
This reminds me a funny tv program I saw a while ago... (am I pushing the app beyond its capabilities? Will find out soon)

Yesterday I saw the swype text input on a HTC phone, apparently it's now available as a beta version.
Ok, here's my wife walking out of the shop. See you next stop.

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