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My reading list
Mathematic explorations

Back on the saddle after a long silence, this time bringing a list of books that have kept me busy... is this a good excuse for not writing blog entries???

With a deadline for this afternoon I cannot spend a lot of time describing each book... yet I want to push myself to communicate some of the mind-opening good reads I came across recently. Most are not new books, and probably you will recognise them.

Without further introduction, here's a list of books about maths, with a twist:

Godel, Escher, Bach: and eternal golden braid by D. Hofstadter

The_Emperor's New Mind by Roger Penrose

In Pursuit of the Unknown: 17 Equations That Changed the World by Ian Stewart

Introducing Chaos, a graphic guide

Art and Physics by Leonard Shlain

Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension by Matt Parker

So, these are some of my current and past reads. Have you read them? Any recommendations down these lines?


In future entries I will explore books about design and programming, creative code, artificial intelligence and some of the books that are relevant to my current role as consultant, dealing with business models, process mapping, implementation patterns and Change Management.

If you have followed this blog from a while back you may be asking: Did I abandon BIM altogether? Well no, I just turned my interest to the reasons behind the use of technology (rather than my hands-on "previous life") and I am now helping major Architectural and Engineering companies navigate the tides of BIM, through maturity assessments, implementation programs and corporate initiatives.

Talk soon,
William.

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